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Do the Dutch look down their noses at everyone else?




According to New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, yes, and there are sound scientific reasons why this is so.
According to economic historians John Komlos and Benjamin Lauderdale, writing in Social Science Quarterly, research shows that Americans were, on average, the "tallest people in the world between colonial times and the middle of the twentieth century." However, the data shows that Americans have "become shorter (and fatter) than Western and Northern Europeans. In fact, the U.S. population is currently on the bottom end of the height distribution in advanced industrial countries."
Americans' relative decline in height comes despite the U.S. having the highest gross domestic product in the world, and is not the result of recent immigration patterns (e.g., more Hispanic immigrants entering the U.S.). The authors point out that "rich Americans are shorter than rich Western Europeans and poor white Americans are shorter than poor white Europeans." Why?
One suggested answer is that Americans eat a lot of low-nutrition fast food. Americans have a lot less family food prep and dining time because adults work so much.
Krugman points out (and here is where the lofty Dutch attitude, or altitude, comes in):
"A broader explanation would be that contemporary America is a society that, in a variety of ways, does not take very good care of its children. Recently, Unicef issued a report comparing a number of measures of child well-being in 21 rich countries, including health and safety, family and peer relationships and such things as whether children eat fruit and are physically active. The report put the Netherlands at the top; sure enough, the Dutch are now the world's tallest people, almost 3 inches taller, on average, than non-Hispanic American whites. The U.S. ended up in 20th place, below Poland, Portugal and Hungary, but ahead of Britain."
Krugman ends by commenting that America seems to have become "a society that for all its wealth somehow manages to be nasty, brutish--and short."
I always supsected the Dutch were thinking lofty thoughts, but I did not know how literally this is true. Tell me, Nederlanders, is it lonely at the top?
(Of course, the Dutch people should rightfully be proud of providing the best conditions in the world for children's development. Maybe if we Americans could do as well, we could...well, stand a little taller.)
Does that mean you had a bad childhood when youre only 5"6, like me?
Brought up on FEBO were you? "De Lekereste"

Peace
Brought up on FEBO were you? "De Lekereste"

Peace

Hahah i was only allowed to get some icecream there every once in a while and thats it
...only certain Dutch people look down their noses at others, and those people should be pitied for their horrific facial deformities.
According to New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, yes, and there are sound scientific reasons why this is so.
According to economic historians John Komlos and Benjamin Lauderdale, writing in Social Science Quarterly, research shows that Americans were, on average, the "tallest people in the world between colonial times and the middle of the twentieth century." However, the data shows that Americans have "become shorter (and fatter) than Western and Northern Europeans. In fact, the U.S. population is currently on the bottom end of the height distribution in advanced industrial countries."
Americans' relative decline in height comes despite the U.S. having the highest gross domestic product in the world, and is not the result of recent immigration patterns (e.g., more Hispanic immigrants entering the U.S.). The authors point out that "rich Americans are shorter than rich Western Europeans and poor white Americans are shorter than poor white Europeans." Why?
One suggested answer is that Americans eat a lot of low-nutrition fast food. Americans have a lot less family food prep and dining time because adults work so much.
Krugman points out (and here is where the lofty Dutch attitude, or altitude, comes in):
"A broader explanation would be that contemporary America is a society that, in a variety of ways, does not take very good care of its children. Recently, Unicef issued a report comparing a number of measures of child well-being in 21 rich countries, including health and safety, family and peer relationships and such things as whether children eat fruit and are physically active. The report put the Netherlands at the top; sure enough, the Dutch are now the world's tallest people, almost 3 inches taller, on average, than non-Hispanic American whites. The U.S. ended up in 20th place, below Poland, Portugal and Hungary, but ahead of Britain."
Krugman ends by commenting that America seems to have become "a society that for all its wealth somehow manages to be nasty, brutish--and short."
I always supsected the Dutch were thinking lofty thoughts, but I did not know how literally this is true. Tell me, Nederlanders, is it lonely at the top?
(Of course, the Dutch people should rightfully be proud of providing the best conditions in the world for children's development. Maybe if we Americans could do as well, we could...well, stand a little taller.)

Well maybe a bit, I do have to say that every time I hear an american say that the US is the greates country in the world, or the "Land of the Free, etc" I always think of the differences between social security, healthcare, freedom and politics... I`ve been to the US on numerous occasions and have never seen so much poverty in for example the Tenderloin in SF then any other countries Ive been too. And, like mentioned in the wikipedia artcile about Dutch customs and ettiquetes (see my other post), we do look down on the 2 party system in the states (and in lesser extent the UK). We actually do think it`s unfair and quite dangerous to give 1 party so much power. And when it comes to healthcare and education, it does seem ridiculous that a country as rich as the US only provide the best services to the rich and don`t provide a universal basic healhcare service (becuase Medi-care is just a poor excuse).... And well, freedom, I don`t think I need to spread my agruments here, it`s quite obvious there are quite a lot of countries where the people are more free then the us...
short dutch girls are hot.
love
s g kinkmonster collins
According to New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, yes, and there are sound scientific reasons why this is so.
According to economic historians John Komlos and Benjamin Lauderdale, writing in Social Science Quarterly, research shows that Americans were, on average, the "tallest people in the world between colonial times and the middle of the twentieth century." However, the data shows that Americans have "become shorter (and fatter) than Western and Northern Europeans. In fact, the U.S. population is currently on the bottom end of the height distribution in advanced industrial countries."
Americans' relative decline in height comes despite the U.S. having the highest gross domestic product in the world, and is not the result of recent immigration patterns (e.g., more Hispanic immigrants entering the U.S.). The authors point out that "rich Americans are shorter than rich Western Europeans and poor white Americans are shorter than poor white Europeans." Why?
One suggested answer is that Americans eat a lot of low-nutrition fast food. Americans have a lot less family food prep and dining time because adults work so much.
Krugman points out (and here is where the lofty Dutch attitude, or altitude, comes in):
"A broader explanation would be that contemporary America is a society that, in a variety of ways, does not take very good care of its children. Recently, Unicef issued a report comparing a number of measures of child well-being in 21 rich countries, including health and safety, family and peer relationships and such things as whether children eat fruit and are physically active. The report put the Netherlands at the top; sure enough, the Dutch are now the world's tallest people, almost 3 inches taller, on average, than non-Hispanic American whites. The U.S. ended up in 20th place, below Poland, Portugal and Hungary, but ahead of Britain."
Krugman ends by commenting that America seems to have become "a society that for all its wealth somehow manages to be nasty, brutish--and short."
I always supsected the Dutch were thinking lofty thoughts, but I did not know how literally this is true. Tell me, Nederlanders, is it lonely at the top?
(Of course, the Dutch people should rightfully be proud of providing the best conditions in the world for children's development. Maybe if we Americans could do as well, we could...well, stand a little taller.)

Well maybe a bit, I do have to say that every time I hear an american say that the US is the greates country in the world, or the "Land of the Free, etc" I always think of the differences between social security, healthcare, freedom and politics... I`ve been to the US on numerous occasions and have never seen so much poverty in for example the Tenderloin in SF then any other countries Ive been too. And, like mentioned in the wikipedia artcile about Dutch customs and ettiquetes (see my other post), we do look down on the 2 party system in the states (and in lesser extent the UK). We actually do think it`s unfair and quite dangerous to give 1 party so much power. And when it comes to healthcare and education, it does seem ridiculous that a country as rich as the US only provide the best services to the rich and don`t provide a universal basic healhcare service (becuase Medi-care is just a poor excuse).... And well, freedom, I don`t think I need to spread my agruments here, it`s quite obvious there are quite a lot of countries where the people are more free then the us...

There,
Enough reason to feel superior, but never looking down their nose at us.

Dag
TAK
Most Americans have this blind belief -- for good reason since it has been pounded into our heads since early childhood -- that no country in the world measures up to us; that we are the best in this and the best in that.

Unfortunately, that is no longer true in so many areas -- education, health care, taking care of the elderly, personal freedoms, basic civil rights. . . the list goes on. Almost any western European country out-shines the U.S. in several of those areas these days.

Yet if you say that publicly here where I live, it almost triggers a lynching. I've had several friends, aquaintances and co-workers grow quite irate when I tell them, for example, that the health care and "social security" systems in the U.K. or in the Netherlands are superior to ours.

They don't want to hear the facts. They just consider any such statement to be "anti-American."

Hell, I grew up in middle America, did my hitch in the Army in the very early '70s, raised my family here and consider myself a loyal American. But I'm not blind. And when I travel, I see many examples of how we are falling behind other countries.

I believer we are giving people in other countries some good reasons to look down their noses at us for some things, especially when we fail to see our own shortcomings and just blindly wave the flag instead of fixing the problems.
Most Americans have this blind belief -- for good reason since it has been pounded into our heads since early childhood -- that no country in the world measures up to us; that we are the best in this and the best in that.

Unfortunately, that is no longer true in so many areas -- education, health care, taking care of the elderly, personal freedoms, basic civil rights. . . the list goes on. Almost any western European country out-shines the U.S. in several of those areas these days.

Yet if you say that publicly here where I live, it almost triggers a lynching. I've had several friends, aquaintances and co-workers grow quite irate when I tell them, for example, that the health care and "social security" systems in the U.K. or in the Netherlands are superior to ours.

They don't want to hear the facts. They just consider any such statement to be "anti-American."

Hell, I grew up in middle America, did my hitch in the Army in the very early '70s, raised my family here and consider myself a loyal American. But I'm not blind. And when I travel, I see many examples of how we are falling behind other countries.

I believer we are giving people in other countries some good reasons to look down their noses at us for some things, especially when we fail to see our own shortcomings and just blindly wave the flag instead of fixing the problems.And people call me Anti-American.

If you don't like it leave and go to one of those left wing Your-a-pee-on countries you love!
Easy to leave it, not easy to emmigrate to a Your-a-pee-on country.
From Channels' lips to ABC News' ears...
This story turned up on the ABC show "Good Morning America" today (June 19). See www.abcnews.go.com., and do a search for "tall".
They give the average Dutch male's height is 6 foot 1 inch, and the average American's as 5 feet 11 inches.
The ABC story did not make clear (as the Paul Krugman NY Times column I quoted from did) that the height difference holds true even if only white males from each country are measured. Therefore, in the "Comments" section on the ABC story, many commenters attacked ABC for not blaming the US's height gap on Hispanic and Asian immigrants, and speculated that this was because ABC was "politically correct". Several could not get their minds around the idea that average young Japanese male is taller than the average young American male.
One young boy (interviewed by ABC outside a McDonalds) said he would not want to go to Europe if people there were taller than he was. A fit-looking young lady suggested she might have to go to Denmark for a boyfriend. (Apparently she did not consider herself a match for the world's tallest men, the Dutch.)
In the interests of fairness, I shot off an email to ABC, demanding that the network give sgcollins equal time to expound on his admiration for short hot Dutch women. As of the time of this writing, I have received no reply from ABC.
a shlo sighting?
hmmmmm...

s:.
I am always wary of broad generalizations as in this study. Besides, we all know that 42.7% of statistics are made up. My personal experience is that the Dutch generally look down on very few people.
Bst,
PotHead

p.s. Very perceptive sidhe333! Good one!
thanks, the contract negotiations with ABC are underway now.
love
s g collins
Without addressing anything else in your post, I'd only like to say...



and anyway, this post has veered from being a 'pun' to something more political. Shouldn't it be moved to another forum?
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